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How to play Egg Thieves

Overview

You are raptors on the hunt for tasty eggs! Those Triceratops have some tasty looking nests just over the next hill. Scout them out, come up with a clever plan, and steal the most eggs!

Components

Components

  • (A) 1 Nest board

  • (B) 5 Player boards

  • (C) 60 egg miniatures in 1, 5, and 20 denominations

  • (D) 20 Raptor cards

  • (E) 70 Egg cards

Setup

  1. Place the nest board (A) in the middle of the table.

  2. Give each player a player board (B) and 5 eggs (C).

  3. Shuffle the raptor deck (D). Place it face down on the left side of the nest board. Draw 4 raptors and place them face-up in the dark card spaces on the nest board.

  4. Shuffle the egg deck (E) and deal out 2 cards to each nest (one face-up, the other face-down. The order doesn’t matter). Then deal out 5 cards to each player. The remaining egg cards will go in a face-down stack on the right side of the nest board.

  5. Randomly choose a starting player. Alternatively, the player who last ate an egg will go first.

During the game, players will be trying to gain eggs from the nests of triceratops by cleverly scouting them out. The game will take place over 5 raids where players will be stealing eggs from the various nests. The player who successfully steals the most eggs by the end of the game will be the winner; and the best fed raptor.

Players are encouraged to work together and form alliances to bring in the biggest egg haul, but in the end there can only be one winner– be careful who you trust!

During your turn

Each player will take turns going clockwise around the table. You may do each action in any order, but you may only do each action once per turn.

  1. Scout for eggs.
  2. Optionally, spend eggs to use the abilities of the available raptors.

At the end of your turn, draw egg cards until you have 5 in your hand. If you have more than 5 cards in your hand at the end of your turn, you will not draw any cards.

Scouting for eggs

Scouting for eggs is done by playing egg cards from your hand into any of the nests (A, B, or C) on the nest board or to any of the corresponding spots (A, B, or C) on your own player board.

Egg cards have a few components. First, there are 5 flavors of egg, represented by the different colors and egg icons. Next, there are a number of eggs that show up on a card that tell you how many of that egg, 1-4, you spotted when scouting out the nest. Finally, on both the front and back of the card are one or two triceratops icons that represent how sneaky you were while scouting out the nest.

Each turn you will always play one face-up card and one face-down. Additionally, you will always play one card to a nest and one card to a spot on your own player board. The order does not matter.

When playing egg cards to a nest, there are a few rules to follow:

  • Always play the card such that the triceratops icons are showing in a stack cascading away from the nest board.
  • Once a nest has met or exceeded 11 triceratops icons, more cards may not be played until the next player’s turn begins. This will trigger a raid at the end of the current player’s turn.
  • You may not look at a face-down card in a nest unless you use a raptor ability to do so.

Playing cards to your own player board is simpler. You may play cards to any spot (A, B, or C) and in any orientation. You may look at face-down cards played to your player board at any time.

Roving raptors

The raptors shown on the nest board are willing to lend an claw in your thieving– in exchange for eggs of course. Raptors have different abilities and different appetites to match. After you’ve completed scouting on your turn, you may choose to spend any eggs you have in your supply to use these abilities. When spending eggs, place them in the area above the raptors with the egg icon (the raptor payment area).

The raptors shown on the player board will be replaced with new raptors after each raid. Once all raptors have been discarded, the game will end– This is equivalent to 5 raids.

Raiding a nest

At the end of each player’s turn, check to see if the number of triceratops icons equals or exceeds 11, the nest will be raided. During a raid, the triceratops will protect the most valuable eggs in a single nest and ignore the rest. Group eggs in a nest by color and then count the egg icons to determine the most valuable. The most valuable eggs are the most common color in the nest. In the case of a tie, all tied eggs will be counted as the most valuable.

  1. Flip over all face-down cards for that nest and all face-down cards in the corresponding spot on all player’s player boards.
  2. Count up the number of eggs for each type in the nest. The most common type(s) will be discarded.
  3. The remaining egg color(s) will be scored by players. Each player will receive eggs equal to the number of eggs shown in the nest plus the number of eggs of the same color in their plan area.
  4. If any players do not have a matching color to eggs in the nest, they’ll receive all eggs in the raptor payment area as a consolation. If multiple players did not have matching colors, the consolation eggs will be divided evenly with any remainder being discarded.
  5. Once all players are finished gathering eggs, the cards for that nest and corresponding player board eggs will be discarded.
  6. Draw a new egg card for the now empty nest; ensuring that it is in the correct orientation.
  7. Discard all raptors and replace them from the deck. If there are no more raptors in the deck, the game will end.

End of game

The game ends immediately after the final raid (or when the raptor deck is emptied, which is the same time!). Each player’s final score is simply the number of eggs they’ve collected. The player with the most eggs is the winner. In the case of a tie, the win will be shared.

Solo variant

There’s an oddly metalic, very shiny, and definitely untrustworthy raptor here to steal the eggs that rightfully belong to you. Compete against one or more Eggbot AIs and try to hit the high score! Eggbots primarily serve to get in the way of human raptor players and make predicting the outcome of raids more difficult. They do not play as normal, but instead operate as a push-your-luck mini-game to minimize your losses. You can play with multiple Eggbots for a bigger challenge.

Setup

The setup is the same as the regular game except that each Eggbot will not start with any eggs. The Eggbots will ‘sit’ at the table and be a part of the regular, clockwise turn order. The player will always go first and will play following the normal rules of the game.

Eggbot turn

  1. Draw 6 cards for the Eggbot’s hand, but keep them face-down in a stack.
  2. You will be choosing cards to assign to different spots on the Eggbot’s player board and multiple nests, one at a time.
  3. You may choose to flip over a card and place it, place it, or discard it. You must take each action twice per turn.
    • Flip and place: Give the Eggbot 1 egg and place in any nest or the Eggbot’s player board slots.
    • Place: Place in any nest or the Eggbot’s player board slots.
    • Discard: If the Eggbot has more than two cards after discarding, give the Eggbot 2 eggs.

Raids

The normal rules apply for raids and gaining eggs. Eggbots will receive eggs from the raptor payment area if they don’t receive eggs from the raid.

End game

The raptor/bot with the most eggs is the winner.

Score range Rank
0 - 39 Hatchling
40 - 49 Fledgling
50 - 59 Squeaker
60 - 69 Growler
70+ Roarer

Appendix

  Name Description
Egg Egg Tasty treat that you must steal from the triceratops
Raptor Raptor Raptors that provide extra abilities that you can use during a raid
Triceratops Triceratops The “owners” of all the eggs we’re trying to steal. 11 of these icons in a nest will trigger a raid
Face-up Face-up egg card Play a card face-up
Face-down Face-down egg card Play a card face-down
Peek Peek Peek at a face-down card in a nest
Draw Draw Draw an egg card
Swap Swap Swap two face-up egg cards in different nests
Egg card examples. From left to right: 1 white egg with 1 triceratops, 3 red eggs with 2 triceratops, 2 purple, 4 green, and 2 yellow.

Egg card examples. From left to right: 1 white egg with 1 triceratops, 3 red eggs with 2 triceratops, 2 purple, 4 green, and 2 yellow.

Nest B has 4 egg cards played to it currently with a total of 7 triceratops showing. Two of the cards are face-down so we don\'t know which egg is the most common right now, but there sure is a lot of green...

Nest B has 4 egg cards played to it currently with a total of 7 triceratops showing. Two of the cards are face-down so we don't know which egg is the most common right now, but there sure is a lot of green…

Four raptors available for the current raid with the **Raptor payment area** at the top.

Four raptors available for the current raid with the Raptor payment area at the top.

Red = 5, Green = 4, White = 6. White is the most valuable and will be eliminated from scoring.

Red = 5, Green = 4, White = 6. White is the most valuable and will be eliminated from scoring.

Red = 3, Green = 6, White = 6. Both Green and White will be eliminated from scoring.

Red = 3, Green = 6, White = 6. Both Green and White will be eliminated from scoring.

The player shown has 4 cards in the matching nest, C, on their player board so they flip them all face-up. Tan isn't in the nest so it will not score. White was the most valuable so it will not score. Green will score a total of 6 eggs (4 from nest + 2 on playerboard) and Red will score 7 (5 from nest + 2 on playerboard).

The player shown has 4 cards in the matching nest, C, on their player board so they flip them all face-up. Tan isn’t in the nest so it will not score. White was the most valuable so it will not score. Green will score a total of 6 eggs (4 from nest + 2 on playerboard) and Red will score 7 (5 from nest + 2 on playerboard).